Gray Tree Frog (Hyla spp.)

Threaded within the spread of creatures big and small in one’s backyard, a sticky-toed amphibian may be quite eye-catching. Or maybe not.

When you first see a gray tree frog (Hyla spp.) working its way up your picture window or resting on the side of your swimming pool, its patches of green, gray, and black coloration may seem striking, complex, and beautiful. These frogs may also be various shades of gray and brown, depending on environmental conditions.

The reason for this coloration becomes apparent when the tree frog is among the lichen and bark of trees. In this case it takes a careful eye to spot these camouflaged herpetofauna.

Another, perhaps easier, way to identify the gray tree frog in its natural habitat is to listen for its call, a trill, which can be heard after sunset during their spring mating season.

A few of these photographed individuals were found around a backyard swimming pool at a country farm; others were spotted in the trees while conducting butterfly surveys.

Gray tree frog (Hyla spp.)

Gray tree frog (Hyla spp.)

Gray tree frog (Hyla spp.)

Gray tree frog (Hyla spp.)

Gray tree frog (Hyla spp.)

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